What Ads With Half-Naked Women Look Like When They’re Turned Into Men | Liberals Unite

What Ads With Half-Naked Women Look Like When They’re Turned Into Men | Liberals Unite.

ads-men-women

The first part of this clip gets into the sexism and rape culture around advertising, but what really illustrates the point clearly is the last half. They use men instead of women in the same ads. The effect is dramatic, and in some cases, totally absurd. Watch

Published on Apr 3, 2013

This culture jam is a school project that was created for a Women and Gender Studies class at the University of Saskatchewan by Sarah Zelinski, Kayla Hatzel and Dylan Lambi-Raine.
We wanted to show how ridiculous media portrays gender roles and stereotypes in advertising through presenting gender roll reversals.

References to the statistics:
Dines & Mumez – Gender, Race and Class in Media: A Text Reader
Levin & Kilbourne – So Sexy So Soon
http://www.assaultcare.ca/index.php?o…
http://www.canadianwomen.org/facts-ab…
http://newyorksociologist.org/11/Berb…
http://www.skidmore.edu/classics/cour…

GOP Searches for Prey | Nel’s New Day

GOP Searches for Prey | Nel’s New Day.

The Komodo dragon is the biggest lizard in the world, about 10 feet long and weighing about 150 pounds. Their size puts them in control of their environment, ambushing their prey, although they tend to eat a great deal of carrion. Their teeth allow them to tear huge chunks of flesh, eating up to 80 percent of their weight in one meal. Dragons of equal size may wrestle, with the losers either retreating or getting killed and eaten by the victor. They also eat their young if the juveniles don’t hide in trees. These creatures have a great deal of trouble hearing and very bad night vision. In captivity, they almost never breed.

Watching the GOP party makes me think of the Komodo dragons, starting with former Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld. He’s on the road with his new book, Rumsfeld’s Rules: Leadership Lessons in Business, Politics, War, and Life, a collection of 380 personal and professional rules. One of these  is “You never want a serious crisis [to] go to waste.”

About this rule, Rumsfeld said, “A crisis can permit you to do things you couldn’t absent an opportunity like that to change the nature of things.” That’s what the GOP party has done since Barack Obama became president, and right now they’re working even harder on it that usual.

Seemingly unable to cause a disaster with their Benghazi pseudo-investigation, they moved on to the latest controversies, the IRS targeting specific groups for additional investigation and the DoJ’s examination of Associated Press’s telephone logs.

Despite the president’s declaration that the IRS targeting these groups is “intolerable and inexcusable” and the IRS acting commissioner’s resigning, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) and House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) are out for blood. They are positive that the IRS has committed criminal acts and are calling for an investigation. McConnell’s approach is bearing fruit because the Tea Party has finally endorsed him as the GOP Senate candidate in 2014. 

Their declarations have a few problems. First, the IRS targeted liberal groups as well as conservative ones for additional scrutiny. Conservatives may not realize this becauseUSA Today didn’t mention this fact until the 18th paragraph of its article and then just a few words. But Emerge America was denied tax-exempt status and forced to disclose its donors and pay taxes. None of the GOP groups have complained about having their applications rejected. Progress Texas and Clean Elections Texas had the same kind of scrutiny. Subjected groups from all political spectra removes the onus from the IRS.

Nobody has even called the IRS efficient or competent so it shouldn’t come as a surprise now that it isn’t. Perhaps a permanent commissioner at the IRS agency would help. Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL), in his “look-at-me-for-president” demeanor, called for the commissioner to be fired. In fact, there is currently no commissioner because Bush’s appointee—in charge while the Tea Party felt targeted—resigned last November, and the Senate was clear that they wouldn’t approve any of the president’s nominations. It’s status quo for Senate approvals: the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives hasn’t had a director since 2006 because of Senate refusal to act on nominees.

This is the first time that the IRS targetings have become a national scandal, but it isn’t the first time that they have done this. Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA) found only one Republican, Rep. Walter Jones (NC), to join him in an investigation during the George W. Bush administration when the IRS threatened to revoke the tax-exempt status of All Saints Episcopal in Pasadena after an anti-Iraq War sermon the Sunday before the 2004 election. At the same time conservative churches across the country were mobilizing voters to support Bush.

In 2004, the IRS went after the NAACP because its chairman criticized Bush for being the first sitting president since Herbert Hoover not to address the organization. In 2006, Public Interest Watch, with 97 percent of its funding from Exxon Mobile, got the IRS to investigate Green Peace, who had labeled the oil company the “No. 1 Climate Criminal.” At about that time, Sen. Charles Grassley (R-IA) wanted “legislative changes” to define the differences between politics and social welfare, but the Senate never got around to it, leaving the IRS auditors to make up their own rules.

The second problem is that decades of laws, regulations, and court decisions are vague and contradictory. The tax code requires that a 501(c)(4) must operate “exclusively” to promote social welfare, a category that excludes political spending. Some court decisions ruled that a minimal amount of political spending would be permissible, but the I.R.S. has for years maintained that groups meet that rule as long as they are not “primarily engaged” in election work, a substantially different threshold. Nobody knows what “primarily engaged” means.

Meanwhile huge SuperPACs are getting away with being tax-exempt while doing massive advertising campaigns. Crossroads has the tax-exempt status, claiming involvement primarily on research and educational activities, but spends most of its money on political advertising.  American Tradition Partnership doesn’t even bother to file federal tax returns.

The third problem, according to Lawrence O’Donnell, started with the Republicans in 1959 when the meaning of the section related to Section 501(c)(4) was changed from “exclusively” to “primarily.” Ezra Klein wrote in the Wonkblog, a great summary of the current IRS troubles:

“The IRS does need some kind of test that helps them weed out political organizations attempting to register as tax-exempt 501(c)4  social welfare groups. But that test has to be studiously, unquestionably neutral.”

O’Donnell said, “If in 2010, there was a flood of Tea Party applications for tax exempt status and many fewer applications for tax exempt status from liberal political groups, then it only makes mathematical sense that more questions would be directed at Tea Party applications.”

Yet the GOP is determined to pin the IRS problems on the president. Although he has no proof, Grassley said that the IRS was “getting pressure from somebody either high up in the Obama campaign or high up in the White House.” There’s nothing to support his position, but GOP love conspiracy theories.

While the GOP is up in arms about the IRS scandal, they have stayed quiet about the phone logs subpoenaed from Associated Press. Even critics of Attorney General Eric Holder like Sen. John Cornyn (R-TX) just say they’ll see “how this plays out.” Even the other Texas senator, Ted Cruz, is silent about it. There’s a good reason. Last year, Republicans called for an explanation of the national security leaks—in short, they asked for exactly what happened to AP. Rep. Trey Gowdy (R-SC) insisted on reporters being subpoenaed.

With their interest in subpoenaing the media, the GOP certainly won’t approve of the “reporter shield” bill that the Obama administration has requested Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-NY) to reintroduce. Such a law would help reporters protect the identity of their sources. Republicans killed similar bills in 2008 and 2010.

The situation can be summarized within the length of a tweet: “GOP calls on Holder to investigate leaks. Holder appoints US Attorney. US Att. subpoenas AP records. GOP calls on Holder to resign.” Steve Benen adds “that the U.S. attorney subpoenaed AP records thanks to an existing vulnerability the administration doesn’t support, but can’t fix thanks to Republican opposition.”

Even Bush’s former AG Albert Gonzalez, who couldn’t even find a law firm to hire him, entered the discussion. He cited a time when he decided against subpoenaing a reporter’s notes but skipped over his massive domestic wiretapping program and “improperly gained access to reporters’ calling records as part of leak investigations”—a lot, according to the New York Times. 

Thus the GOP, feeding on carrion, are stuck with a non-existent Benghazi investigation, an IRS debacle coming from the GOP lack of ability to take action, and a press-government interaction that’s bound to make them look bad. We can guarantee, however, that they’ll continue to tear huge chunks out of the first two while ignoring the third one, that is a serious problem for continued democracy in the United States. And of course, the GOP won’t do anything about finding jobs for the people in the United States.

Army Sexual Assault Prevention Office Coordinator Accused of ‘Abusive Sexual Contact’

By Robert Burns 05/14/13

WASHINGTON — A soldier assigned to coordinate a sexual assault prevention program in Texas is under investigation for “abusive sexual contact” and other alleged misconduct and has been suspended from his duties, the Army announced Tuesday.

Just last week an Air Force officer who headed a sexual assault prevention office was himself arrested on charges of groping a woman in a parking lot.

The Army said a sergeant first class, whose name was not released, is accused of pandering, abusive sexual contact, assault and maltreatment of subordinates. He is being investigated by the Army Criminal Investigation Command. No charges have been filed.

He had been assigned as an equal opportunity adviser and coordinator of a sexual harassment-assault prevention program at the Army’s 3rd Corps headquarters at Fort Hood, Texas, when the allegation arose, the Army said.

“To protect the integrity of the investigative process and the rights of all persons involved, no more information will be released at this time,” an Army statement said.

The back-to-back Army and Air Force cases highlight a problem that is drawing increased scrutiny in Congress and expressions of frustration from top Pentagon leaders. Pentagon press secretary George Little said after Tuesday’s announcement that Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel is angry and disappointed at “these troubling allegations and the breakdown in discipline and standards they imply.”

Little said Hagel met with Army Secretary John McHugh earlier Tuesday and ordered him to “fully investigate this matter rapidly, to discover the extent of these allegations and to ensure that all of those who might be involved are dealt with appropriately.”

Hagel also is directing all the services to retrain, recredential, and rescreen all sexual assault prevention and response personnel and military recruiters, Little said.

Sen. Carl Levin, D-Mich., chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, issued a statement Tuesday evening saying his panel is considering a number of measures to counter the problem, including changes to the Uniform Code of Military Justice, and will act on them next month.

“Tragically, the depth of the sexual assault problem in our military was already overwhelmingly clear before this latest highly disturbing report,” Levin said.

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., said she intends to present new comprehensive legislation on Thursday to reform the military justice system by removing chain-of-command influence from prosecution of sex abuse crimes.

“To say this report is disturbing would be a gross understatement,” Gillibrand said. “For the second time in a week we are seeing someone who is supposed to be preventing sexual assault being investigated for committing that very act.”

House Armed Services Committee Chairman Howard P. “Buck” McKeon, R-Calif., said in a statement he was “outraged and disgusted by the reports out of Fort Hood.”

McKeon, noting he has a granddaughter in the Army, said he saw “no meaningful distinction between complacency or complicity in the military’s latest failure to uphold their own standards of conduct. Nor do I see a distinction between the service member who orchestrated this offense and the chain of command that was either oblivious to or tolerant of criminal behavior. Both are accountable for this appalling breach of trust with their subordinates.”

The Army announcement comes as the Pentagon continues to struggle with what it calls a growing epidemic of sexual assaults across the military. In a report last week, the Defense Department estimated that as many as 26,000 military members may have been sexually assaulted last year, based on survey results.

Of those, fewer than 3,400 reported the incident, and nearly 800 of them simply sought help but declined to file formal complaints against their alleged attackers.

The military is struggling with a variety of sexual assault scandals, including an ongoing investigation into more than 30 Air Force instructors for assaults on trainees at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas, and the recent arrest of the Air Force’s head of sexual assault prevention on charges of groping a woman in a Northern Virginia parking lot.

A police report said that Air Force Lt. Col. Jeffrey Krusinski was drunk and grabbed a woman’s breast and buttocks. The woman fought him off and called police, the report said. A judge has set a July 18 trial date for Krusinski.

Congressional outrage over these incidents and two recent decisions by officers to overturn juries’ guilty verdicts in sexual assault cases has prompted outrage on Capitol Hill.

Air Force Lt. Gen. Craig Franklin reversed the conviction of Lt. Col. James Wilkerson, a former inspector general at Aviano Air Base in Italy, who was found guilty last year of charges of abusive sexual contact, aggravated sexual assault and three instances of conduct unbecoming an officer and a gentleman.

And Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., is holding up the nomination of Air Force Lt. Gen. Susan Helms, tapped to serve as vice commander of the U.S. Space Command, until McCaskill gets more information about Helms’ decision to overturn a jury conviction in a sexual assault case.

Members of Congress also met at the White House with senior administration officials to talk about measures to encourage more victims to come forward and ensure that perpetrators face justice.

___

Associated Press writer Lolita C. Baldor contributed to this report.

via Army Sexual Assault Prevention Office Coordinator Accused of ‘Abusive Sexual Contact’.

This Kid Was Bullied A LOT. He Could Have Told His Teacher Or His Principal. He Had Bigger Plans.

http://www.upworthy.com/this-kid-was-bullied-a-lot-he-could-have-told-his-teacher-or-his-principal-he-had-bigger-plans?c=upw10

11-year-old Caine Smith was choked, beaten, harassed, and was called a long list of names simply because he had two moms and long hair. Instead of staying locked away and hiding, he stood up and did something about it.

http://vimeo.com/65313147

This Kid Was Bullied A LOT. He Could Have Told His Teacher Or His Principal. He Had Bigger Plans.

http://www.upworthy.com/this-kid-was-bullied-a-lot-he-could-have-told-his-teacher-or-his-principal-he-had-bigger-plans?c=upw10

11-year-old Caine Smith was choked, beaten, harassed, and was called a long list of names simply because he had two moms and long hair. Instead of staying locked away and hiding, he stood up and did something about it.

Embarrassment Is A Powerful Tool For Social Change – Erin Matson

http://erintothemax.com/2013/05/14/embarrassment-is-a-powerful-tool-for-social-change/

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Embarrassment Is A Powerful Tool For Social Change

by erintothemaxToday Minnesota will become the twelfth state, in addition to the District of Columbia, to remove discrimination against lesbian and gay people from its marriage laws. Just last year, it was the first state in the nation to defeat a ballot initiative that would have amended its constitution to ban marriage between same-sex couples — by 51.2% of the vote. This turnaround is truly remarkable, and from an activist perspective, it illustrates how useful embarrassment can be as a tool for social change.To be sure, decades of difficult work made this moment possible — including grassroots organizing work, legislative coalition building work and electoral work. But we can’t discount the hard work that spanned more than one generation fighting to take pride in identity, people coming out of the closet — often at significant personal cost — to say, I’m gay and I’m proud, and others standing beside them and saying, and why should we not embrace that?Ultimately, all of this work together has made it embarrassing to support legal bigotry on the basis of sexual orientation unless you are part of the extremely extreme extremist right wing. For those who are not, it is embarrassing to be associated with those folks. As it should be.   Bachmann-in-the-BushesOne of the nation’s most overt bigots goes covert: Rep. Michele Bachmann (R-MN), hides in the bushes during an LGBT rights rally outside the Minnesota Capitol.

Across movements, greater acceptance and inclusion at a societal level are the underpinnings of progress to protect civil and human rights legislatively. Often the link between societal desire and legislative progress is tenuous (reference the recent failure of a background check expansion for gun purchases, which had the support of 91% of the population and failed in the U.S. Senate), because legislators are more often beholden to donors spending big money to support the status quo. So they tend to move slower.What this means, as activists, is that embarrassment is a tool we shouldn’t turn our backs on as a motivator for social change. Minnesota, as a state, was rightfully embarrassed by the right-wing push last year to ban same-sex marriage; the law changed. Senators who voted against gun background checks should rightfully be embarrassed for acting so far outside the will of the people; there are signs we may get a new vote. Anti-abortion rights extremists who call me a baby killer should rightfully be embarrassed when I remind them I am so pregnant I can hardly see my feet; and a few have apologized when they realize that. This is as it should be. Embarrassment works.That said, I want to draw a clear line between embarrassment, which I define here as public consternation around one person’s actions or views inasmuch as they hinder the dignity, rights and/or worth of others, and shaming, which I define here as public consternation around one person’s actions or views affecting only themselves. For instance, attacking the weight of Gov. Chris Christie (R-NJ) is not embarrassment as a sound strategy to effect social change (if you want to get him out of office, stick to his policies), it’s public fat shaming that reifies bad societal ideas that one’s body is an appropriate forum for public comment and intervention. The bottom line is that embarrassment and shaming are different tactics, and one is ethical while the other is not.People should be embarrassed when their intolerance is showing. At times, they can be embarrassed into change. Public embarrassment is one tool activists shouldn’t be afraid to employ.erintothemax | May 14, 2013 at 11:36 am |

http://erintothemax.com/2013/05/14/embarrassment-is-a-powerful-tool-for-social-change/