10 incredible black women you should know about

Source: https://www.cnn.com/2019/02/23/us/african-american-women-in-history/index.html

"Being dragged off that bus was worth it just to see Barack Obama become president," said Claudette Colvin, who before Rosa Parks was arrested for keeping her bus seat in Montgomery, Alabama.

“Being dragged off that bus was worth it just to see Barack Obama become president,” said Claudette Colvin, who before Rosa Parks was arrested for keeping her bus seat in Montgomery, Alabama.

Black history is American history.

It’s easy to say. But while most grade school teachers agree that the experience and contributions of African-Americans are essential to understanding the nation’s past, only about 9% of total class time — about one or two lessons — gets devoted to it, a 2015 study by the National Council for the Social Studies found.
 
Part of why, the study found, is that teachers often lack the confidence to teach black history and aren’t sure “how and what content should be delivered.”
 
Certainly worthy are these trailblazers, who excelled in fields that, until they made their mark, had been off-limits to black women.
 

The first published poet

Phillis Wheatley, the first published African-American woman poet, is shown in an engraved portrait.

Phillis Wheatley, the first published African-American woman poet, is shown in an engraved portrait.
Phillis Wheatley was the first African-American poet to publish a book.
Born in 1753, she was brought to New England from West Africa as a slave when she was nearly 8 years old.
The Wheatley family purchased and named the young girl, and after discovering her passion for writing (they caught her writing with chalk on a wall), tutored her in reading and writing.
She studied English literature, Latin, Greek and The Bible. With the family’s help, Phillis Wheatley traveled to London in 1773 and published her first poems. Soon after, when she returned to America, she was granted her freedom.
 

The first college graduate

Mary Jane Patterson made history when she graduated in 1862 from Oberlin College.

Mary Jane Patterson made history when she graduated in 1862 from Oberlin College.
Mary Jane Patterson was 16 years old when her family, among others, moved to Ohio in hopes of sending their children to college. The daughter of a master mason, Patterson became the first black woman to graduate from an established American college, Oberlin College.
Three years after her completing her studies in 1862, Patterson was appointed a teacher assistant in the Female Department of the Institute of Colored Youth in Philadelphia, according to the African American Registry.
She later taught at the Preparatory High School for Colored Youth, renamed Dunbar High School, serving as the school’s first black principal from 1871 to 1874.
 

The first nurse

Mary Eliza Mahoney is recognized as the first black nurse in the United States.

Mary Eliza Mahoney is recognized as the first black nurse in the United States.
Mary Eliza Mahoney, born in 1845, had been a cook, a janitor and a washerwoman before she began working at the New England Hospital for Women and Children, according to Jacksonville University.
When she was 33, she entered the hospital’s 16-month nursing program and earned her certification.
In a 40-year career, Mahoney directed the Howard Orphan Asylum in Long Island, New York, and was a founding member of the group that became the American Nurses Association.
After retirement, Mahoney continued to fight for minority rights and in 1920 became one of the first women to register to vote in Boston.
 

The first bank president

Maggie Lena Walker broke race and gender barriers as the first woman to establish and serve as president of a US bank.

Maggie Lena Walker broke race and gender barriers as the first woman to establish and serve as president of a US bank.
Maggie Lena Mitchell, the daughter of a former slave, went to public schools in Richmond, Virginia, became a teacher and established a newspaper before founding the St. Luke Penny Savings bank in 1903, according to the National Park Service.
In chartering the bank and serving as its first president, Mitchell broke gender and racial barriers.
She later she served as board chairwoman when the bank merged with two other Richmond banks, the park service reports. The resulting entity until 2009 was recognized as the nation’s oldest continually African-American-operated bank.
 

The first to refuse to give up her seat

Before Rosa Parks, Claudette Colvin, then 15, was arrested for not giving up her bus seat to a white person in Montgomery, Alabama.

Before Rosa Parks, Claudette Colvin, then 15, was arrested for not giving up her bus seat to a white person in Montgomery, Alabama.
Claudette Colvin broke ground nearly 10 months before Rosa Parks.
In March 1955, Colvin, then just 15 years old, was arrested for violating an ordinance in Montgomery, Alabama, that required segregation on city buses, according to a Stanford University entry. Colvin went to jail without a chance to call her family, a University of Idaho researcher wrote.
Colvin and other women challenged the law in court. But black civil rights leaders, pointing to circumstances in Colvin’s personal life, thought Parks would make a better icon for the movement.
“Being dragged off that bus was worth it just to see Barack Obama become president,” Colvin said in the 2017 book “Still I Rise.” “So many others gave their lives and didn’t get to see it, and I thank God for letting me see it.”
 

The first White House correspondent

Alice Dunnigan made history in 1947 as the first black woman to cover the White House.

Alice Dunnigan made history in 1947 as the first black woman to cover the White House.
Alice Dunnigan was mostly ignored during White House news conferences — until John F. Kennedy became President. That’s when Jet Magazine, in 1961, ran the headline, “Kennedy In, Negro Reporter Gets First Answer in Two Years,” according to The Poynter Institute, a journalism school and think tank.
Dunnigan, born in 1906 in rural Kentucky, was the daughter of a tenant farmer and a laundress. She began penning columns at just 13 years old.
She graduated from Kentucky State University and taught for 18 years before moving to Washington. In 1947, she became chief of the Associated Negro Press and the first African-American woman accredited to cover the White House, according to the Kentucky Commission on Women Foundation.
 

The fastest in the world

Track star Wilma Rudolph, 20, lunges across the finish line at the 1960 Summer Olympics in Rome.

Track star Wilma Rudolph, 20, lunges across the finish line at the 1960 Summer Olympics in Rome.
Wilma Rudolph was dubbed “the fastest woman in the world” and in 1960 became the first American woman to win three gold medals in track and field at the same Olympic Games, according to the National Women’s History Museum.
Rudolph also championed civil rights, refusing to attend a segregated homecoming parade in her honor.
Rudolph later earned a degree from Tennessee State University and was inducted into the US Olympic Hall of Fame.
 

The first Nobel Peace Prize winner

Kenyan environmental and political activist Wangari Maathai was the first African woman to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. She earned her bachelor's and master's degrees in the United States.

Kenyan environmental and political activist Wangari Maathai was the first African woman to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. She earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in the United States.
Kenyan ecologist Wangari Maathai became the first black woman to win the Nobel Peace Prize.
An outspoken environmentalist, Maathai was honored in 2004 for standing at the “front of the fight to promote ecologically viable social, economic and cultural development in Kenya and in Africa,” according to the African American Registry.
Maathai earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees at American universities before completing her doctorate and founded the Green Belt Movement, the largest tree-planting campaign in Africa. She has been recognized as Time Magazine’s “Hero of the Planet.”
 

The first in space

Mae Jemison is an engineer, physician and NASA astronaut. She became the first African-American woman to travel into space in 1992.

Mae Jemison is an engineer, physician and NASA astronaut. She became the first African-American woman to travel into space in 1992.
Mae Jemison began studying at Stanford University when she was just 16 years old. She earned a degree in chemical engineering and in 1981 a doctorate in medicine from Cornell University.
Jemison was chosen for NASA’s astronaut program in 1987 and became the first black woman to travel in space in 1992 after launching with the Space Shuttle Endeavour crew.
Afraid of heights, she nevertheless logged 190 hours, 30 minutes, 23 seconds in space, NASA said.
 

The first trans politician

Andrea Jenkins hugs a supporter in 2017, upon winning a Minneapolis City Council seat.

Andrea Jenkins hugs a supporter in 2017, upon winning a Minneapolis City Council seat.
Andrea Jenkins in 2017 became the first openly transgender person of color elected to public office in the United States.
By the time voters chose her to serve on the Minneapolis City Council, she’d notched more than 25 years of public service experience, working as a policy aid, nonprofit director and employment specialist.
Jenkins campaigned on issues including reducing police violence, combating climate change, ending voter suppression and making available more affordable housing. She is a writer, performance artist, poet and transgender activist.
 

One of the “Women Who Lead” needs our help

Source: Okay Newport and beyond! Listen up! – News Lincoln County

Traci Flowers
She has helped so many others and now we all must help her…

Many Lincoln County residents know what a precious resource we have in a woman who runs Grace Wins Haven at the fairgrounds in Newport. Traci Flowers has been a constant drum-beat for the down, but not quite out, for a number of years. Traci established her shelter and “a hand up” operation so that those down on their luck, or who need medical help, can get what they truly need.

The Newport area has been very generous in helping Traci help others. But now Traci needs help herself. Traci’s been having some very serious health issues lately that borders on life and death. She’s been taken back and forth to a hospital in Portland that has literally saved her life. But the battle’s not over.

Traci and those who love her have set up a “Go Fund Me” account on the internet to help pay her medical bills. If you can find it in your mind and heart to donate to Traci’s medical fund you will be helping the Central Coast’s Angel among Angels. Here’s the link to Go Fund Me.

Family and Medical Leave Insurance – Salem – Week of June 3rd

Yes, I want to support FAMLI with NOW in Salem in the week of June 3rd

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Yes, I want to support FAMLI with NOW in Salem in the week of June 3rd

 
Oregon NOW participates in the Time 2 Care coalition which is organizing support for the bill introducing Family and Medical Leave Insurance for Oregon. In support of the coalition’s efforts, we would like to commit Oregon NOW, including all local chapters, to provide on-site support in Salem during the week of June 3rd.

Our obligation will be to have a few people show up in Salem every day to provide a visible presence in support of the bill. We would like to have a team of two or more in the Capitol Building each day. Their responsibilities will be to distribute literature as Time 2 Care instructs and to visit with Senators and Representatives either to thank them for support or to ask for their support to the bill. You don’t have to plan on a full day, but half a day is requested. We will arrange volunteer housing that is relatively nearby (Eugene, Corvallis, Albany, Salem) to help members whose travel to/from Salem is too many miles for a comfortable day trip.

June seems pretty late in the legislative game, but if legislation is still alive, it could be a critical period for support. In order to commit NOW to taking the lead with the legislature during this week, we would like to have a commitment from enough people to expect at least two people to be in the Capitol every day. We know, too, that the first week of June is far in the future; make your best guess now and let us know if your plans change.

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Newport Warming Shelter needs supplies and volunteers


Entrance to the Warming Shelter at the fairgrounds off NE 3rd

Baby it’s cold outside…. The Winter Shelter at the Newport fairgrounds is going full force with many people needing a safe warm place to be during these freezing nights. As the weather report continues to show a cold spell through next week, we are going through supplies faster than ever with both the day and night shelter being open on a regular basis.

We need of juice, milk, bread, soft fruit, desserts, canned and frozen food to be cooked in a microwave or toaster oven, prepared dinners, and breakfast supplies, Clorox wipes, cleaning supplies, paper products like paper bowls, hot and cold cups, napkins, paper towels, plastic ware, garbage bags, etc…!!

Drop off your donations at the Newport fairgrounds off 3rd. Go up the driveway and park in front of the Exhibit Hall.

Source: Newport Warming Shelter needs supplies and volunteers – News Lincoln County

 

Valentine’s Day Candlelight Vigil for One-Year Anniversary of H.S. Shooting

On Valentine’s Day (Thurs., Feb. 14), a Candlelight Vigil will be held at Ann and Don Davis Park (840 W. Olive St., Newport) Gazebo from 5:30 to 6:30 to remember the lives lost at school shootings across America.

This date marks the one-year anniversary of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School tragedy in Florida.

Sponsored by Central Coast Ceasefire-Oregon – www.ceasefireoregon.org

February Legislative Update – Rep. David Gomberg

Hello Friends,

I hope everyone has been safe and warm during the sudden cold snap.

It is the middle of week three and the legislative session is off to a very busy start! Committees are hearing bills, the phones are ringing, we receive hundreds of emails each morning, and I’ve been holding information meetings during every unscheduled moment each day here in Salem.

Here’s a brief update on a few items of interest…

Read the entire letter here: February Legislative Update

 

Why We Celebrate Black History Month—And What We Still Need To Learn

Source: Why We Celebrate Black History Month—And What We Still Need To Learn

Statement by NOW President Toni Van Pelt and Christian Nunes, Chairwoman of the Racial Justice Committee

02.01.2019
WASHINGTON – Every February, we observe Black History Month as a way of celebrating, honoring and absorbing the lessons of the African Americans who have contributed so much to our culture, our communities and our nation. This year, we are witnessing a transformation in our politics, with more women of color running for office, getting elected and making a difference than ever before.While Donald Trump and his overwhelmingly white, male Administration wage a mean-spirited, discriminatory and racially divisive campaign to undermine civil rights protections, we need to remember the words of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Dr. King said, “We are now faced with the fact that tomorrow is today. We are confronted with the fierce urgency of now. In this unfolding conundrum of life and history, there ‘is’ such a thing as being too late. This is no time for apathy or complacency. This is a time for vigorous and positive action.”

Black History Month reminds us of the “fierce urgency of now.”  That’s always been the watchword of the National Organization for Women. As part of NOW’s core principles, we see human rights as indivisible, and we will continue to stand in solidarity and follow the lead of African Americans across the country, working together to overcome the barriers to justice and equality that have been imposed by racism.

Contact

NOW Press , press@now.org , 202-628-8669
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