“Challenges Facing Lincoln County Latino Community” – Topic of Joint NOW/LWV Forum

On Tuesday, February 27, 2018, the Central Oregon Coast Chapter of the National Organization for women (NOW) and the League of Women Voters (LWV) of Lincoln County will jointly host a discussion about “Challenges Facing the Lincoln County Latino Community.” Leading the discussion will be Omar Antonio-Hernandez, Executive Director of Centro de Ayuda, and Centro’s board chair, Virginia Gibbs. The discussion will take place in the McEntee Meeting Room, Newport Public Library, 35 NW Nye Street, Newport at 6 pm. The public is welcome.

The Latino population of Lincoln County is approaching 10%, and is close to 20% in Newport. Latinos contribute significantly to the economic wellbeing of Lincoln County. They also face challenges not faced by others in the community. Antonio-Hernandez and Gibbs will discuss these challenges and what is and/or can be done to address them.

Following the discussion, Central Oregon Coast NOW and LWV of Lincoln County will conduct brief business meetings. Anyone interested in the discussion or in NOW or LWV is encouraged to attend.

For more information:
NOW website:  www.centraloregoncoastnow.org
LWV website:  www.lwvlincolncounty.org

Snapshots from our Picnic at Waterfront Park – Toledo

A Time to Relax with Friends, Family, and Food

We enjoyed lots of yummy food, including pizza, pasta salad, beans, oreo-chocolate balls, homemade blackberry pie, and much more.
After a late lunch, some of the attendees went boating! (Photos below.)

Nancy, Linda, and Rosie in yellow boat on left. Picnic shelter in background.

 

Rosie, Linda, and Nancy demonstrate their boating skills.

 

Tom and Sheila quickly paddle away.

 

Last, but not least, George and Franki row out to join the fun.

 

Close call … but collision averted.

 

Geoff helps the crew disembark.

Award will honor Depoe Bay woman

The Oregon Commission for Women (OCFW) recently announced its recipients of the 2016 Women of Achievement Awards, and one of those named is a Lincoln County resident.   Nancy Campbell Mead, of Depoe Bay, was selected for this honor because she “is a tireless champion for the rights of all woman and girls,” commission ocials said in a press release.  

After a distinguished career as a judge of the district and circuit courts for Washington County, working on domestic violence issues on behalf of vulnerable communities, Campbell Mead retired and moved to Depoe Bay, where she advocates full time for women’s equity on the local, state and national levels. After founding the highly successful Central Coast Chapter of the National Organization for Women (NOW) with community and educational services for women and girls, she joined the NOW national board with specific interests for promoting the national Equal Rights Amendment and ending mass incarceration. Her advocacy is inspired by her three granddaughters and her wish for an equitable future for them.  

The other woman selected for the award was Chanpone Sinlapasai-Okamura of Lake Oswego for her role as an advocate for the rights of immigrants and refugees. A partner with Marandas Sinlapasai, P.C., she represents clients on general immigration law matters and focuses her practice on assisting children who are survivors of domestic violence, serious crime and human tracking.  

“Each of these women is a dynamic leader and role model with a strong record of service to the on the local, state and national levels. We are pleased to honor these extraordinary women,” said Dr. Barbara Ramírez Spencer, OCFW chair.  

The honorees will receive their awards in a ceremony to be held March 8.   Since 1985, the Oregon Commission for Women has presented the Woman of Achievement Award to women in Oregon for leadership and success in their area of expertise, promoting the status of women in society, refl ecting a commitment to equity and diversity, and serving as exemplary role models.  

The Oregon Commission for Women was legislatively established in 1983 to work for women’s equality. The commission does this by advocating for women in the community, providing information on women to the governor and state legislature, serving as a link for women to state agencies, and providing services to individual women in Oregon.

Newport News Times, February 24, 2017, B4

WE ARE STRONGER TOGETHER

By Carolyn Crandall, Chair   Lincoln County Democratic Central Committee

My organization had the proud honor of partnering with NOW, PFLAG and the Diversity Committee to create a march to bring our community together to let the world know that we are not taking this administration’s backward stance on our rights.  

We showed them that we care about each other, something they might want to learn to do. It has become perfectly clear where they want to take our country and we are having none of it. We did not have 200 or 400 or 600 show up. We had 1,600 people who came together in the rain to send this very important message; we are here, and we are loud, and we are not going away.  

We are so grateful for the opportunity to be with our fellow Americans to sing, to chant, to carry signs of resistance and to listen to inspiring speakers. We thank the Hallmark for their support in helping make this march a complete success. We could not accommodate all 1,600 in the Hallmark, but it did not deter them from standing in the gravel across the street and wait for spots to open up in the rally. Some of our speakers went out to them and spoke about our rights and how we can work together to protect them. We rotated people in and out so as many as possible could get inside to hear our amazing speakers and visit the organizations that had tables set up.  

We thank KYAQ for live streaming the event. We thank the Newport police and their volunteers for watching out for us during the march. Businesses came out to their front doors and smiled and waved to us. This was a community function that brought us together and to prove that we are stronger together. Stay tuned for more events coming soon.

Letters to the Editor, Newport News Times, January 27, 2017, A6

NOW plans ‘finger-food’ potluck on Nov. 29

Because of the positive and large response to its annual dinner, the Central Oregon Coast Chapter of the National Organization for Women (NOW) is holding a special meeting for prospective, new and “seasoned” members on Tuesday, Nov. 29, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Newport High School’s Boone Center, 322 NE Eads St.  

Those attending are asked to bring their favorite “fingerfood” to share (but this is not a requirement to attend). The meeting will provide an opportunity to learn about NOW, meet other like-minded individuals, and plan for the future of Central Oregon Coast NOW.  

“We will be discussing what committees people would like to participate in, the Jan. 21 Women’s March, Jan. 22 Roe vs. Wade Day, the Oregon NOW annual meeting to be held in Newport on April 9, 2017, and other upcoming actions,” organizers said.  

Reservations are not required but would be helpful for planning purposes. People can email centraloregoncoastnow@gmail.com for more information or to let the group know they plan to attend.  

Information is also available by calling 503-577-3585 or viewing the group’s website at www.centraloregoncoastnow.com.  

The Central Oregon Coast Chapter of NOW works locally and nationally to eliminate discrimination in all sectors of society, to assure access to reproductive health care, to eliminate domestic and sexual violence, and to promote equality and justice in our community.

Membership in the local chapter also includes membership in national NOW, and Oregon NOW. To join Central Oregon Coast NOW, go online at https://centraloregoncoastnow.com/about/membership-application/

Newport News Times, November 26, 2016, B3

Turnout triples for local women’s group dinner

BY CALLEY HAIR   Of the News-Times, November 26, 2016

nancy-sheila

Nancy Campbell Mead (left) and Sheila Swinford smile at the Central Oregon Coast National Organization for Women annual dinner Thursday, Nov. 18 at the Deep Sea Café in Nye Beach. Turnout was three times higher than expected, a surprise the women attribute to concern over the recent election. (Photo by Calley Hair)

NEWPORT — Every year, the Central Oregon Coast chapter of the National Organization of Women (NOW) holds an annual dinner. And every year, the event draws around 30 people, said Oregon NOW board member Nancy Campbell Mead.  

But this year, about 90 people showed up to the Nov. 18 gathering — just 10 days after President-elect Donald Trump earned 290 Electoral College votes to Hillary Clinton’s 232 in an upset unforeseen in virtually every poll leading up to Election Day.   It’s not a coincidence, Mead said.  

“It was the first woman to be on a ticket, and everyone thought she was going to win,” she said. “You wake up the next morning, and it’s Donald Trump.”  

For the 42 percent of female voters across the nation who voted to “Make America Great Again,” that was good news. But for many of NOW’s newcomers, it was a blow — if a wakeup call to get involved at the community level.  

“Like many, I was really disheartened by the rhetoric during his campaign. Especially the sexism and the racism ,” said Cheryl Brown, a NOW newcomer and oceanographer at the Hatfield Marine Science Center in South Beach. ”I decided I needed to be involved more locally.”  

The mother of an 11-year old girl, Brown said she knew her daughter had been following the election closely and was discouraged at the results. But she also knew her daughter would watch at how Brown responded in the aftermath of the news.  

“She’s definitely been paying attention,” Brown said. “It’s just clear that we still have work to do.”  

After sharing a post about the Nov. 18 gathering on Facebook, Brown ended up attending with 12 other local women.  

“There’s someone who works at the community college, someone who works at the school district, there’s some Hatfield folks, a writer … someone who owns a small business,” Brown said. “All walks of life.”  

National headlines might have spurred triple the usual turnout at the dinner, but most of what NOW does is geared locally, said Sheila Swinford, the chapter’s president.  

“One of the most powerful things I think can happen is this community building, where we’re able to talk to each other and decide to get some things done.”  

The unexpected turnout at the Nov. 18 dinner was inspiring, if a little inconvenient — with almost 100 people packed into Nye Beach’s Deep Sea Café, it was hard to hold a constructive conversation, Swinford said.  

As a result, the group will hold another meeting Tuesday, Nov. 29, a potluck at the Newport High School Library where they’ll incorporate the new faces into the group and reassess their goals looking toward 2017.  

She’s expecting between 90 and 100 people.  

“It was a response. We normally don’t have a regular meeting in the same month a regular dinner,” Swinford said. “We were taken by surprise at the annual dinner, but it was wonderful, and we were very happy.”  

The typical group meeting usually involves a speaker with expertise in some specific topic, like immigration, reproductive health, homelessness , sexual assault, gun legislation — anything members want more information on the issues.  

“We’re really focused on issues that may be important to everybody,” Mead said, “but especially interesting to women.”  

In the future, the group plans to send a couple members to the “Women’s March on Washington” at the nation’s capital Jan. 21, 2017, and to the coordinating event in Portland.  

Central Oregon Coast NOW members pay $35 in annual dues, Mead said. Individuals don’t have to be card-carrying members to get involved with the group’s projects.  

“It’s really important to think, as citizens, what do you want?” Swinford said. “It isn’t some sort of formal, disciplined kind of thing. Let’s work together.”  

Contact reporter Calley Hair at 541-265-857 1 ext. 211 or chair@newportnewstimes.com.

 

Earthquake Camp for Girls is this Week!

Lots of planning and hard work have gone into Central Oregon Coast NOW Foundation’s Earthquake Camp for middle school girls which will take place starting tomorrow, July 17, 2016 at Oregon Coast Community College, Lincoln City.  Special thanks go to local geophysicist Kay Wyatt who is leading the camp and has been instrumental in its planning, the Siletz Tribal Charitable Contribution Fund and NW Natural for awarding  substantial sums that made the camp possible, and to the members of the Central Oregon Coast NOW STEM Committee: Janice Eisele, Chair; Michele Walters, Kayleen Williams, Anne Sigleo, Jen Martin; and to community volunteers, Bonnie LaTendresse and Alexis Paul.

Only some of what the Earthquake Camp girls will get to take home with them, in addition to knowledge and enthusiasm, a seismometer, and the ability to contribute to family preparedness! :

image2

NOW showing immigration documentary

On Tuesday, May 24 at 6 p.m., the Central Oregon Coast Chapter of the National Organization for Women (NOW) will host a viewing of the fi lm “Abrazos,” a documentary by award winning director Luis Argueta (“abUSed: The Postville Raid” and “The Silence of Neto”).  

The film tells the story of a transformational journey of a group of U.S. citizen children who travel from Minnesota to Guatemala to meet their grandparents for the fi rst time.   “Without saying a word about the injustice of immigration laws, [“Abrazos”] shows us how connected we are, yet how politics and borders arbitrarily infl ict separation,” said Judy Ancel, University of Missouri – Kansas City.  

The film will be shown at the Central Lincoln PUD meeting room, 2129 N. Coast Highway in Newport.   Following the fi lm, Central Oregon Coast NOW will conduct a brief business meeting. Anyone interested in the film or in the Central Oregon Coast Chapter of the National Organization for Women (NOW) is encouraged to attend.  

For more information, please email centraloregoncoastnow@gmail.com or visit www.centraloregoncoastnow.com.

May 18, 2016 Newport News Time B1

Witnessing Herstory at the Golden Crown Literary Society Conference

Central Oregon Coast NOW Member and highly acclaimed lesbian author Lee Lynch is honored at the Golden Crown Literary Society Conference in New Orleans. Congratulations Lee!

By JD Glass on July 28, 2015

I suspect that back in late July of 1969, no one would have foreseen what a late July in 2015 would bring, less than 50 years later.

But some of the folks—some of the women—who were instrumental in seeding, agitating, and actively fighting for the changes we’ve seen and are grateful to have, were gathered in one room to celebrate both their achievements and the ones of the generations that have followed.

And I’m certain that none of them, nor us, would have imagined the Golden Crown Literary Society—both the organization, and its annual event this year—would be home to perhaps one of the most historic moments in modern queer history.

Yes, the Golden Crown Literary Society Annual Conference (held this year in New Orleans, next year will see it in DC), which includes an award and recognition night, was home to the regathering of queer icons:

Lee Lynch, whom I had the honor of presenting an award to for her non-fiction work, An American Queer; Dorothy Allison, author of Bastard Out of Carolina (as well as other titles), was not only the Key Note speaker, but also accepted the Trailblazer award for Joan Nestle—founder and original curator of the Herstory Archives; and Rita Mae Brown, who received the Lee Lynch Classic Book Award for her classic work, Rubyfruit Jungle.

Lee Lynch.  Photo by Sue Hardesty

Lee Lynch. Photo by Sue Hardesty

These women were quite literally at the forefront—the birth—of the queer rights and women’s movement.

What they went through both personally and professionally to not only tell, but live their truths, was outstandingly courageous, and especially considering that it was during a time that not only was being queer grounds for being jailed in so many places, but also women weren’t allowed to have things as simple as credit cards without either a husband or a father to get it for them.

To see them in this gathering of queer women—and some queer men—queer folks identifying, self-describing, proudly themselves, and gathered together—not to secretly gather, nor to plan tactics, but to openly celebrate our lives, our stories: our history, past, present, and future.

Part of that present and future history included an award given to Jacob Anderson-Minshall (in conjunction with his wife, Diane Anderson-Minshall, Editor-at-Large for The Advocate), making him the first out transman to receive a Goldie (as the awards are affectionately called) for their non-fiction work Queerly Beloved: A Love Story Across Genders

Rita Mae Brown was as passionate as the character she created and received the award for. “You’re alive—you fight. You keep fighting.” She reminded us all to continue to speak our truths, to tell our stories and that if we are “defined by our oppression,” then we are still oppressed.

Carleen Spry, Director of Outreach for the GCLS said, “We’ve seen history made this year on a national level. And we’ve seen history at the Golden Crown Literary Society 11th Annual Conference, in the gathering of these trailblazers. I felt privileged to experience and be a part of this historic event.”

Karin Kallmaker, author of 18th & Castro (among many others) presented the award to Joan Nestle. As she said, “It was inspiring and challenging to get such an amazing woman into PowerPoint. Joan broke ground for all of us.”

Dorothy Allison, in accepting the award for Joan Nestle, spoke about the beginning of the Herstory Archive, taking a moment to ask Lee Lynch if she remembered those magic moments in that living room/dining room.

“Oh children,” Dorothy said, looking out on us with wonder on her face, “I wish you could have seen that living room,” just as much as she wished Joan could have been with us at that moment to see what’s become of the movement she helped form.

As Sandra Moran, author of Letters Never Sent says, “Dorothy Allison’s work, both as an author and as an activist, has had so much impact on so many of the women at the Golden Crown Literary Society Conference. To have the opportunity to introduce her and to hear her speak with so much beauty and passionate intensity, was amazing. It was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity that I don’t think any of us will forget.”

On the other side of the give-and-give love fest, Lee Lynch herself says, “The Golden Crown Literary Society is a powerful organization for lesbians. Attending is a rejuvenating, inspiring experience enhanced by the contact with other dyke readers and writers. I staggered home after a tsunami of love, gratitude and respect that washed over bright, talented and impassioned 350 women.”

But ultimately, Kris Dresen, graphic novelist and creator of Max & Lily – The Complete Collected Strips, sums it up best: “This was my first GCLS, let alone Goldie Awards. To find myself in a room with Rita Mae Brown, Dorothy Allison, and Lee Lynch as Joan Nestle was being honored was slow to sink in but mind-blowing to realize. A once-in-a-lifetime opportunity that I am so glad I was a part of.”

And I, like Dorothy Allison, wish we could have all been there.

Following is a list of all the winners; for further information about the Golden Crown Literary Society, visit them here and/or email to inquiries@goldencrown.org

Debut Author:

Just Intuition – Makenzi Fisk

Never Too Late – Julie Blair

Stick McLaughlin: The Prohibition Years – CF Frizzell

Romantic Suspense/Intrigue/Adventure:

The One – JM Dragon

Sharpshooter – Leslie Murray

Switchblade – Carsen Taite

Poetry:

Undone – EM Hodge

Kissing Keeps us Afloat – Laurie McFayden

Mystery/Thriller:

The Acquittal – Anne Laughlin

Left Field – Elizabeth Sims

The Consequence of Murder – Nene Adams

Young Adult:

Double Exposure – Bridget Birdsall

Riding the Rainbow – Genta Sebastian

Just Girls – Rachel Gold

Anthology/Collection (Creative Non-Fiction):

Queerly Beloved: A Love Story Across Genders – Diane Anderson-Minshall and Jacob Anderson-Minshall

An American Queer – Lee Lynch

Paranormal/Horror:

The Magic Hunt – LL Rand

The Devil You Know – Marie Castle

Dogs of War – Geonn Cannon

Erotica:

Heart’s Surrender – Emma Weimann

Best Lesbian Erotica 2014 – Rachel Windsor

Escapades – MJ Williamz

Dramatic/General Fiction:

The War Within – Yolanda Wallace

Loved and Lost – Stephanie Kusiak

Everything – Carole Wolf

Anthology/Collection (Fiction):

Wicked Things – Jae and Astrid Ohletz

Unwrap These Presents – Astrid Ohletz and R.G. Emanuelle

Historical Fiction:

Tangled Roots – Marianne K. Martin

Waiting for the Violins – Justine Saracen

The Bright Lights of Summer – Lynn Ames

Traditional Contemporary Romance:

Kiss the Girl – Melissa Brayden

Nightingale – Andrea Bramhall

The Midnight Moon – Gerri Hill

Science Fiction/Fantasy:

FutureDyke – Lea Daley

Return of an Impetuous Pilot – Kate McLachlan

Rabbits of the Apocalypse – Benny Lawrence

Tee Corinne Outstanding Cover Design:

Everything – Ann McMan designer

Ann Bannon Popular Choice Award:

Olive Oil and White Bread – Georgia Beers

Lee Lynch Classic Book Award:

Rubyfruit Jungle by Rita Mae Brown

Trailblazer Award: Joan Nestle

GCLS Directors Volunteer Award: Watty Boss

On the other side of the give-and-give love fest, Lee Lynch herself says, “The Golden Crown Literary Society is a powerful organization for lesbians. Attending is a rejuvenating, inspiring experience enhanced by the contact with other dyke readers and writers. I staggered home after a tsunami of love, gratitude and respect that washed over bright, talented and impassioned 350 women.”

But ultimately, Kris Dresen, graphic novelist and creator of Max & Lily – The Complete Collected Strips, sums it up best: “This was my first GCLS, let alone Goldie Awards. To find myself in a room with Rita Mae Brown, Dorothy Allison, and Lee Lynch as Joan Nestle was being honored was slow to sink in but mind-blowing to realize. A once-in-a-lifetime opportunity that I am so glad I was a part of.”

And I, like Dorothy Allison, wish we could have all been there.

Following is a list of all the winners; for further information about the Golden Crown Literary Society, visit them here and/or email to inquiries@goldencrown.org

Debut Author:

Just Intuition – Makenzi Fisk

Never Too Late – Julie Blair

Stick McLaughlin: The Prohibition Years – CF Frizzell

Romantic Suspense/Intrigue/Adventure:

The One – JM Dragon

Sharpshooter – Leslie Murray

Switchblade – Carsen Taite

Poetry:

Undone – EM Hodge

Kissing Keeps us Afloat – Laurie McFayden

Mystery/Thriller:

The Acquittal – Anne Laughlin

Left Field – Elizabeth Sims

The Consequence of Murder – Nene Adams

Young Adult:

Double Exposure – Bridget Birdsall

Riding the Rainbow – Genta Sebastian

Just Girls – Rachel Gold

Anthology/Collection (Creative Non-Fiction):

Queerly Beloved: A Love Story Across Genders – Diane Anderson-Minshall and Jacob Anderson-Minshall

An American Queer – Lee Lynch

Paranormal/Horror:

The Magic Hunt – LL Rand

The Devil You Know – Marie Castle

Dogs of War – Geonn Cannon

Erotica:

Heart’s Surrender – Emma Weimann

Best Lesbian Erotica 2014 – Rachel Windsor

Escapades – MJ Williamz

Dramatic/General Fiction:

The War Within – Yolanda Wallace

Loved and Lost – Stephanie Kusiak

Everything – Carole Wolf

Anthology/Collection (Fiction):

Wicked Things – Jae and Astrid Ohletz

Unwrap These Presents – Astrid Ohletz and R.G. Emanuelle

Historical Fiction:

Tangled Roots – Marianne K. Martin

Waiting for the Violins – Justine Saracen

The Bright Lights of Summer – Lynn Ames

Traditional Contemporary Romance:

Kiss the Girl – Melissa Brayden

Nightingale – Andrea Bramhall

The Midnight Moon – Gerri Hill

Science Fiction/Fantasy:

FutureDyke – Lea Daley

Return of an Impetuous Pilot – Kate McLachlan

Rabbits of the Apocalypse – Benny Lawrence

Tee Corinne Outstanding Cover Design:

Everything – Ann McMan designer

Ann Bannon Popular Choice Award:

Olive Oil and White Bread – Georgia Beers

Lee Lynch Classic Book Award:

Rubyfruit Jungle by Rita Mae Brown

Trailblazer Award: Joan Nestle

GCLS Directors Volunteer Award: Watty Boss

http://www.afterellen.com/people/444927-witnessing-herstory-golden-crown-literary-society-conference

March is Women’s History Month

“Women’s History Month is an annual declared month that highlights the contributions of women to events in history and contemporary society. It is celebrated during March in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Australia, corresponding with International Women’s Day on March 8, and during October in Canada, corresponding with the celebration of Persons Day on October 18.” en.wikipedia.org · Text under CC-BY-SA license

2015 Theme:  Weaving the Stories of Women’s Lives – The National Women’s History Project believes “[t]he theme presents the opportunity to weave women’s stories – individually and collectively – into the essential fabric of our nation’s history.”

On Tuesday, March 24 at 6 p.m. at its regular meeting at Central Lincoln PUD Meeting Room, 2129 North Coast Highway, Newport, Central Oregon Coast NOW will celebrate Women’s History Month by having renowned lesbian author (and NOW member!) Lee Lynch discuss her book “The American Queer: The Amazon Trail”, a collection of her columns which chronicle over 25 years of her life as a lesbian.  Her column, “The Amazon Trail” has been running since 1986.  Winner of numerous awards, among them the 2009 Golden Crown Literary Society Trailblazer Award for lifetime achievement, recognizing the contributions Lynch has made to the field of lesbian literature.  In 2012, the Golden Crown Literary Society issued a new award for classic fiction and named it The Lee Lynch Classics Award. The  book awarded with the very first trophy was Lynch’s 1985 novel, The Swashbuckler.