Facebook and Domestic Violence Survivor Safety

NNEDV has teamed up with Facebook to create a guide on privacy and safety for survivors. As many advocates are aware, abusers use isolation as a technique to control their partners, but in leaving their abusers many survivors find themselves

isolated even further in their attempts to stay safe. NNEDV

recognizes how important it is for survivors to remain connected, both offline and online, to family and friends. Thus

Safety and Privacy on Facebook: A Guide for Survivors of Abuse was unveiled at the NNEDV Technology Summit. You can access the guide by visiting www.nnedv.org and searching for “Facebook privacy and safety guide” or by clicking here. https://fbcdn-dragon-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-prn1/851584_613437522011141_1298974833_n.pdf

The guide is the most current product of a partnership that

began in 2010 when NNEDV joined Facebook’s Safety Advisory Board. The guide addresses privacy on Facebook and also provides safety tips and options in the event that someone is

misusing the site to harass, monitor, threaten, or stalk.

Here at the Oregon Coalition we are continually grateful to be a part of NNEDV, which consistently supports the needs of

victims of domestic violence, dating abuse, and stalking. If you would like more information about technology and how

survivors of domestic and sexual violence can navigate a

variety of technologies safely, please contact Coalition staff. We look forward to working together to ensure survivors are safe online and off.

-Keri Moran-Kuhn, Director of Programs

#FBrape Campaign Takes on Facebook Misogyny and Wins!

#FBrape Campaign Takes on Facebook Misogyny and Wins!.

Congrats to Women, Action, and the Media and The Everyday Sexism Project for harnessing the power of social media to bring about positive change in well, social media. More than 60,000 tweets and 5,000 emails later, the spirited campaign that revolved around the #FBrape hashtag resulted in Facebook admitting that it has failed to remove content that promotes gender-based violence. The company has now agreed to drastically revamp what it considered gender-based hate speech.
It was only a little more than a week ago that a coalition of about 100 women’s rights and social justice groups, spearheaded by Jaclyn Friedman of WAM!, decided to do something about Facebook content that promotes or makes a joke of rape and other forms of violence against women. They urged Facebook users to contact the companies that had advertisements appearing alongside offensive content and to contact Facebook directly about policing such content. Says Laura Bates, founder of The Everyday Sexism Project,
We have been inspired and moved beyond expression by the outpouring of energy, creativity and support for this campaign from communities, companies and individuals around the world. It is a testament to the strength of public feeling behind these issues.
In the social media platform that now boasts more than one billion users, one doesn’t have to search hard to find fan pages, timeline photos and Internet memes that treat gender-based assault as a punchline. Groups with offensive and misogynist names such as “Hope you have pet insurance because I’m about to destroy your pussy” or “Raping a pregnant bitch and telling your friends you had a threesome” are numerous and serve to normalize violence against women.
Besides releasing a statement that it would update its user guidelines and moderate gender-based hate speech more closely, Facebook also invited WAM! and The Everyday Sexism Project to provide input on how its new Community Standards should look.
Kudos to both the activists and Facebook for moving forward together to ensure women feel safer in digital spaces! Said a very pleased Jaclyn Friedman,
We are reaching an international tipping point in attitudes towards rape and violence against women. We hope that this effort stands as a testament to the power of collaborative action.

WAM!

http://www.womenactionmedia.org/fbagreement/

Tuesday, Women, Action & the Media, the Everyday Sexism Project and author/activist Soraya Chemaly launched a campaign to call on Facebook to take concrete, effective action to end gender-based hate speech on its site. Since then, participants sent over 60,000 tweets and 5000 emails, and our coalition has grown to over 100 women’s movement and social justice organizations.

Today, we are pleased to announce that Facebook has responded with a important commitment to refine its approach to hate speech. Facebook has admirably done more than most other companies to address this topic in regards to content policy. In a statement released today, Facebook addressed our concerns and committed to evaluating and updating its policies, guidelines and practices relating to hate speech, improving training for its content moderators and increasing accountability for creators of misogynist content.

Facebook has also invited Women, Action & the Media, The Everyday Sexism Project and members of our coalition to contribute to these efforts and be part of an ongoing conversation. As part of these efforts, we will work closely with Facebook on the issue of how Community Standards around hate speech are evaluated and to ensure best practices represent the interests of our coalition.

For details regarding Facebook’s response, please visit here.

Facebook has already been a leader on the internet in addressing hate speech on its service. We believe that this is the foundation for an effective working collaboration designed to confront gender-based hate speech effectively. Our mutual intent is to create safe spaces, both on and off-line. We see this as a vital and essential component to the valuable work that Facebook is doing to address cyber-bulling, harassment and real harm.

“It is because Facebook has committed to having policies to address these issues that we felt it was necessary to take these actions and press for that commitment to fully recognize how the real world safety gap experienced by women globally is dynamically related to our online lives,” explains Soraya Chemaly.

“We have been inspired and moved beyond expression by the outpouring of energy, creativity and support for this campaign from communities, companies and individuals around the world. It is a testament to the strength of public feeling behind these issues.” says Laura Bates, founder of the Everyday Sexism Project.

Jaclyn Friedman, executive director of Women Action and the Media (WAM!), said: “We are reaching an international tipping point in attitudes towards rape and violence against women. We hope that this effort stands as a testament to the power of collaborative action.”

We are hopeful that this moment will mark an historic transition in relation to media and women’s rights in which Facebook is acknowledged as a leader in fostering safer, genuinely inclusive online communities, setting industry precedents for others to follow.We look forward to collaborating with these communities on actions both big and small until we live in a world that’s safe and just for women and girls, and for everyone.

Arizona 3-year-old fatally shoots himself in face with meth grandma’s gun | The Raw Story

Arizona 3-year-old fatally shoots himself in face with meth grandma’s gun | The Raw Story.

A judge in Arizona on Thursday order a 35-year-old grandmother held in lieu of $500,000 bond after she was charged in the death of her 3-year-old grandson, who allegedly shot himself in the face with her handgun.

In a court appearance on Thursday, Yuma Justice of the Peace Greg Stewart notified Rachel B. Spry that she was charged with reckless manslaughter, possession of dangerous drug, possession of drug paraphernalia and possession or use of a weapon in a drug offense, according to the Yuma Sun.

The Yuma Police Department said that officers had arrested Spry on Wednesday after reports of a child being shot. Her grandson, 3-year-old Darrien Nez, was later pronounced dead at Yuma Regional Medical Center.

 

Court documents indicated that Spry had placed her 9mm handgun in a backpack and left it on top of a dryer while helping her daughter pack for a move. She had seen her grandson come into the room where the backpack was located, but she continued packing. About five minutes later, she heard a gunshot.

The court records also claimed that a methamphetamine pipe was found in the same backpack as the gun, and that she had admitted to using the drug the evening before the shooting occurred.

KYMA reported that Spry’s Facebook page included several photos of her with here family. There was also of photo of a Smith & Wesson handgun with the caption “my best friend.”

http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2013/05/03/arizona-3-year-old-fatally-shoots-himself-in-face-with-meth-grandmas-gun/?utm_source=Raw+Story+Daily+Update&utm_campaign=e037ba2975-5_3_135_3_2013&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_1b6404e40c-e037ba2975-194921985