Open The Kavanaugh Hearing To More Women

WASHINGTON–In 1991, Angela Denise Wright never got to tell her story to the Senate Judiciary Committee of being harassed by Clarence Thomas. She was waiting

Source: Open The Kavanaugh Hearing To More Women | National Organization for Women

When Men’s Worry Is More Important Than Women’s Safety

Why are men closing ranks around Brett Kavanaugh and others accused of sexual misconduct? It’s about self-preservation.

Source: When Men’s Worry Is More Important Than Women’s Safety | HuffPost

‘Deny, Deny, Deny’

Toxic masculinity and our rape culture are front and center this week as Republicans are working to exonerate their new Supreme Court justice nominee from an accusation of attempted rape when he wa…

Source: ‘Deny, Deny, Deny’ | Nel’s New Day

NOW Launches National Action Campaign

With women’s rights facing more severe threats than we have seen in decades, NOW is fighting back. We are standing up for the rights and well being of all women, in all our diversity and in all communities. We are showing up for our allies in Muslim communities, in immigrant communities, in LGBTQIA communities. We have a message for Donald Trump and every politician enabling his white male supremacist agenda: We are leading societal change and promoting feminist ideals — and you need to get out of our way.

I am thrilled to let you know that today we are launching NOW’s expanded National Action Program. This program encompasses five action campaigns that not only defend the gains we have made, but also work pro-actively to achieve real equality for women and girls.

  • Our campaign to Mobilize for Reproductive Justice will work to defeat Neil Gorsuch’s nomination to the Supreme Court, and we will fight to defeat Trump’s Alternative Health Care Act (Trumpcare), which would defund Planned Parenthood, drastically cut maternity care coverage, and imperil access to birth control. We will also promote pro-active bills like the EACH Woman Act to guarantee full coverage of abortion care in all plans including Medicaid–thus permanently repealing the Hyde Amendment–and the Women’s Health Protection Act to stop states from using deceptive legislation to shutter abortion clinics.
  • Through our campaign to End the Sex Abuse to Prison Pipeline, we will urge the Title IX coordinators in middle and high schools around the country to ensure that students who are survivors of sexual assault receive the wraparound services they need in order to stay in school, recover from their trauma, and thrive. Survivors in far too many public schools, especially girls of color and LGBTQIA students, face penalties, punishment, and school pushout instead of the trauma-informed services they need.
  • Our campaign to Advance Voting Rights recognizes and responds to the impacts on women in communities targeted by right-wing voter suppression schemes. We will work with our allies in the civil and human rights communities to overturn measures like racial gerrymandering, voter ID laws, and voter purges. And we will work with our civic engagement allies to encourage women of color not only to vote, but also to run for public office and for leadership roles in their political parties.
  • Our renewed campaign to Ratify the Equal Rights Amendment includes working for ratification of the 1972 ERA by three more states (to meet the constitutional requirement that three-fourths of the states ratify a proposed amendment), as well as supporting a start-over strategy for a new ERA, and engaging younger women and girls in the struggle for women’s constitutional equality. In this effort, NOW is committed to an inclusive and intersectional ERA interpretation that includes equitable access to all aspects of reproductive health care, and centers marginalized people including LGBTQIA individuals, immigrants, women of color, and women with disabilities.
  • Finally, our campaign to Protect Immigrant Rights will work with our allies in the immigrant rights community to oppose Trump’s unconstitutional Muslim ban and to stop the Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s abusive raids, detentions, and deportations that tear families apart. We will in particular work to keep restaurant workers safe from abusive enforcement tactics, knowing that the restaurant industry employs over one million undocumented workers, second only to the construction industry.

NOW’s national action program will propose concrete actions our local chapters, state organizations, members and activists can take, as well as anyone in the general public interested in addressing such issues, along with resources and platforms for engagement. The program will also grow and evolve as we respond in very real-time to the harmful and discriminatory actions of Donald Trump’s administration.

As NOW members and leaders, your role is central to our success. The tools created by the NA Program are intended to be helpful for you as you engage your communities, and your representatives, both locally and nationally. We want to hear from you: your successes, your challenges. How can we better support and equip you to do this important work? This program will strive to increase engagement at all levels of NOW–from the local to the national–and to build unity among our thousands of dedicated grassroots activists across the country.

This is undeniably a challenging time for all of us. But we have been so inspired by the millions of people who have already stood up and committed themselves to resistance just in the last few months. Let’s build on this momentum and make sure this current administration knows we are here, we are watching them, and we are prepared to take the necessary action to defend our rights–and especially the rights of the most marginalized across this country.

Trump May Have (Unintentionally) Helped Women!

October 14, 2016

Central Oregon Coast NOW member Kate Madison just wrote this on the Reality Chex Commentariat:

Ironically, Trumpster’s psychopathic sexually predatory behavior toward so many women–and we know there are more–has given us an opening to raise the consciousness of many unenlightened Americans! Just as with the LGBT movement, which is now seeing daylight in much of the country, sexual harassment/abuse of women is an issue which has finally jumped into the spotlight. We have Trump and his unevolved locker room buddies to thank! And actually–a buncha White Republican guyz.

I, and so many other women, have felt sickened and re-traumatized by the revelation of Trump’s longtime disgusting behavior. Michelle Obama, in her impassioned speech, has spoken for all of us! Many in the MSM have also spoken up (except, of course, Fox) in dismay and disgust. It feels as if in the last few days the lights have started turning on in America. With Trump falling down the rabbit hole, we have permission to strip away the self-blame and self-disgust of many victimized women who stayed silent. We are watching “victim shaming” morph into “perp shaming.”

Best of all, Michelle Obama has become a first lady on a par with Eleanor Roosevelt, and has cemented her husband’s legacy as POTUS!

And Donald Trump will be remembered in history as a power hungry, pathological lying lunatic who, in the end, will be as pathetic as his “idol,” Richard III. As he is dying on the electoral battlefield, we will hear him screaming: “A pussy, a pussy–my kingdom for some pussy!”

The Sex-Abuse-to-Prison Pipeline: How Girls of Color Are Unjustly Arrested and Incarcerated

Your Take: Black and brown girls are first victimized and then punished, often in connection with sexual violence that has been perpetrated against them.

Posted: July 9 2015 3:00 AM
Getty Images

Getty Images

In 2014, President Barack Obama announced My Brother’s Keeper, a desperately needed initiative to create educational and economic opportunities for black and brown boys and men. In addition to My Brother’s Keeper, there has been a new and emerging recognition that mass incarceration must come to an end, along with the school-to-prison pipeline that relegates so many youths of color to the juvenile-justice system.

Against the backdrop of these efforts, there seems to be a common trope that girls of color are fine. Unlike black and brown boys, they are not endangered by punitive school policies that push them out, or a systematic criminalization of their behavior that pipelines them into the juvenile-justice system. Black and brown girls are not fine, and their struggles are being dangerously left out of the discursive spaces on criminal-justice reform.

My organization, the Human Rights Project for Girls, along with the Georgetown Law Center on Poverty and Inequality and the Ms. Foundation for Women, just released “The Sexual Abuse to Prison Pipeline: The Girls’ Story” (pdf), a report that exposes how girls, specifically girls of color, are arrested and incarcerated as a result of sexual abuse.

One in 3 juveniles arrested (pdf) is a girl. Girls tend to be arrested at younger ages than boys, usually entering the system at age 13 or 14. And while girls are only 14 percent of incarcerated youths, they make up the fastest-growing segment of the juvenile-justice system.

Sexual abuse is one of the primary predictors (pdf) of girls’ detention. Girls are rarely arrested for violent crimes. They are arrested for nonviolent behaviors that are correlative with enduring and escaping from abusive environments—offenses such as truancy and running away. Many girls run away from abusive homes or foster-care placements, only to then be arrested for the status offense of running away. Whereas abused women are told to run from their batterers, when girls run from abuse, they are locked up.

There is also the grim example of how girls are criminalized when they are trafficked for sex as children. When poor black and brown girls are bought and sold for sex, they are rarely regarded or treated as victims of trafficking. Instead, they are children jailed for prostitution. According to the FBI, African-American children make up 59 percent (pdf) of all prostitution-related arrests under the age of 18 in the U.S., and girls make up 76 percent (pdf) of all prostitution-related arrests under the age of 18 in the U.S.

Another lens through which to understand the degree of sexual violence and trauma endured by justice-involved girls is their own histories. The younger a girl’s age when she enters the juvenile-justice system, the more likely she is (pdf) to have been sexually assaulted and/or seriously physically injured. One California study found that 60 percent (pdf) of girls in the state’s jails had been raped or were in danger of being raped at some point in their lives. Similarly, a study of delinquent girls in South Carolina found that 81 percent (pdf) reported a history of sexual violence: Sixty-nine percent had experienced violence by their caregiver, and 42 percent reported dating violence.

It has to be pointed out, as the “Sexual Abuse to Prison Pipeline” report does, that this is, distinctly, a pipeline for girls of color. Youths of color account for 45 percent of the general youth population, but girls of color—who are approximately half of all youths of color—make up approximately two-thirds of girls who are incarcerated.

There must be real questions raised about why girls of color are being imprisoned for their victimization. Why is the status of victim or survivor denied to girls of color at the margins? Why are they not contemplated as victims, and do entrenched racial mythologies that frame black and brown girls as oversexualized, promiscuous and sexually loose contribute to the denied status?

We must surface the hidden and disregarded realities of how vulnerable black and brown girls are treated differently, and indeed punished, for their experiences of sexual and physical abuse. We cannot continue to leave them behind. Because their lives matter.

The Root aims to foster and advance conversations about issues relevant to the black Diaspora by presenting a variety of opinions from all perspectives, whether or not those opinions are shared by our editorial staff.

Malika Saada Saar is executive director of the Human Rights Project for Girls and special counsel on human rights for the Raben Group.

http://www.theroot.com/articles/culture/2015/07/the_sex_abuse_to_prison_pipeline_how_girls_of_color_are_unjustly_arrested.html

“‘I LOVE THIS NEW MILLENNIUM”

In response to a recent letter to the editor in the June 17 edition of the Newport News Times, Newport resident Vicki Norton responded:

To piggyback on the excellent responses in the June 24 paper to Michael Hale’s letter of June
17, “Whatever happened to the way things were?,” I submit a few more examples of the “good
old days” of the 1950s.
Women were not a substantial part of the work force, and if they did work, it was mostly in
the traditional “women’s work” jobs. They stayed in unhappy and abusive marriages because they
couldn’t earn enough to support their families, and it was perfectly acceptable for a man to
smack his wife and kids around if he felt like it. There was plenty of alcohol, but no treatment
for alcoholics . There was sex abuse, but families kept it secret, just like mental illness was
kept secret, and drug abuse, and domestic violence.
It was all there, just like now, only then it was just not talked about. Kids endured a
nightmare of teasing and meanness from their peers in the schools, and nobody intervened.
People of color were ostracized from suburban neighborhoods, biracial couples were ostracized
everywhere , as were their children . And on top of that, it was acceptable to slaughter wild
animals for sport or to make toys or trinkets to destroy rain forests, to waste natural resources
and endanger whole species of life on our earth.
Those were the “good old days” of the 1950s. Oh, how I love this new millennium.
Vicki Norton
Newport

http://www.newportnewstimes.com/v2_e_edition.php?toc_id=995&heading=8&view_single=true